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Anyone have any experience with it, have yet to hear any negatives. Other than the fact that it requires a slightly different technique. Heard they have been using it in Europe for years. Was thinking of doing some work with it. Anyone have any input?
 

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I have a lot of experience with it, I'm a tech rep for PPG that's the only basecoat we are pushing right now! There are different techniques to spraying it, but paint is paint, my customers have responded well to it, they actually perfer it over the solvant based basecoats! I've had a lot of fun with it!
 

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I just saw that last Thursday on Street Customs show. They had PPG come in and change out all their paint from solvent based to waterbourne. West Coast Customs used it on a Maybach. They sprayed black but it looked to have blue and green tints to it when it was wet. They showed it when it dried and it was a very nice wet looking black that had a very nice shine to it and finish to it.
 

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What's the cost difference between waterbourne vs solvent? I know waterbourne is better for the environment, but I was quoted about $2500-3000 to paint my ram w/ solvent based.
 

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The "water" doesn't look anything like the color that its supposed to be, until the water/reducer evaporates out of the color, you can't tell the color until it "flashes".its definately an interesting product, I have been useing it for about a year and a half now, when a solvent based show calls because of a problem that they are having I cringe because I'm used to using the "water" and I actually hate going back in time so to speak with the solvent!
 

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What do you mean by "color changing"
Like you said when you spray it on it doesn't look like the color. It's not until it flashes off that the true color comes out. I'm saying not all waterborne systems are like that.
 

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Your right, and not all waterborne systems are true water either, as a fact, the only 2 that are true water is PPG Envirobase and NEXA Aquabase, the reat of the systems are a solvent "Hybrid" systems. I have competition that claims to have true water but when they can mix in a normal tin can that and the V.O.C rating, and the MSDS tells me that their "water" isnt true water!
 

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Yes but true water systems have a shelf life on their tints/toners and also have a freeze point. I spray Glasurit 90 line and the tints are solvent. It doesn't become water until you mix them with the water mixing base and water reducer. The tints have no shelf life, which is good because the tints are so strong and concentrated that you use very little of them.

Roughly 960 grams make up 1 sprayable quart. Under 200 grams of that is actual tint, the rest is water.
 

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Just a FYI every tint/toner solvent or water has a shelf life, solvent is 3 years opened and 6 years not opened, hmm wierd, thats the same as the water toners, don't get me wrong 90 line is a damn good product! And for being a "hybrid" its probably the best in the market, in my opinion anyway! The BASF shops are the toughest ones to convert, but once they see some of the plusses and products that PPG has, it becomes a no brainer, just from what I have experienced.I have a friend that sprays 90 line, so I have the ability to use that product when I need to find out something, the only reason he hasn't converted is because of a contract his boss is into with them. As for the water freezing, its a latex based resin so it never really freezes, And the PPG does come in insulated shipping containers so that there isn't ever any question of a freeze, believe me when I tell you that we have every road covered for any reason, we did our homework when we realesed the product!
 

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No, its not a product that dried with UV, you need a lot of airflow to flash the "water", most paint booths alone don't have enough airflow to flash the water, they need a supplenental air moving system that blows a lot of air across the panels that are being painted!
 

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Water-borne is a pain in the ass. It is very dependent on the correct temperature and humidity. I couldn't imagine spraying more than a spot spray with the stuff. High base coat films usually result in wicked popping. We have issues using robotic equipment that meter fluid out in cc's. I'd stick with the tried and true solvent-borne paints. They are a lot easier to work with. Especially if you are painting a job on your own. We process 250+ units a day through my booth with water-borne paints (PPG and NPA).
 

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No, its not a product that dried with UV, you need a lot of airflow to flash the "water", most paint booths alone don't have enough airflow to flash the water, they need a supplenental air moving system that blows a lot of air across the panels that are being painted!

Heated flash off and cooling tunnels are used to flash the solvents out of the water-borne paint. You can actually touch the base coat without leaving a print after it has flashed.
 

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Another little fact: Water and solvent borne paints are incompatible. When mixed, they create hydrogen sulfide, which is explosive. So be careful when when cleaning your equipment. I'd recommend having two separate tanks for cleaning each system.
 

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Water-borne is a pain in the ass. It is very dependent on the correct temperature and humidity. I couldn't imagine spraying more than a spot spray with the stuff. High base coat films usually result in wicked popping. We have issues using robotic equipment that meter fluid out in cc's. I'd stick with the tried and true solvent-borne paints. They are a lot easier to work with. Especially if you are painting a job on your own. We process 250+ units a day through my booth with water-borne paints (PPG and NPA).
I'm curious why you have high mil thickness on your basecoat when the water is less than half the thickness as the solvant basecoat, your right about the "popping" thats caused from to much material in to little time, so your telling me that you are abusing the basecoat by not giving the proper flash time, as for tempature, the water isnt affected by the tempeture, i agree that humidity does play a role to slowing the flash time, my cure to that is to turn on the burner to the booth to dry the incoming air, just bring the dewpoint up beyond the outside air, your paint tech guy should know this stuff and get you in the right direction! My appologies for sounding harsh but i know this stuff works well, i have a local shop with 4 booths doing over 700 hours a day through them, with Aquabase, and the only complaint they have is that I dont come by often enough to buy lunch. If you have any questions feel free to P.M me, and i'll do my best to help you out.:D
 
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