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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, i have a 1999 Dodge Durango, i was just wondering if a transmission cooler is worth the money? I do a little bit of towing and have 31" tires should i invest and install a cooler? I just dont want my transmission to fail. My Duango has 180,000 miles on it and I've had no problems thus far, just maybe trying to prevent a problem from occuring.
 

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Do a search one summit racing, they have a few different types (oil coolers, fluid coolers etc..) you can't go wrong with either. I ran a Hayden Oil Cooler that came as a kit with hose barbs hoses and fittings, only thing you will need to find is the Mopar, AMC, Dodge, Jeep fitting to thread into the radiator hole (There is the factory fluid cooler that runs inside the radiator), can't remember htread size.....5/8" maybe.... when you do a search on summit you should be able to find it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks! I found a few different ones. Now are you talking about the fitting the goes into the cooler or the actually radiator on the car?
 

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Not only that but you should bypass the radiator integrated cooler completely. Not only will the trans stay cooler (the trans fluid can only get down to whatever temp the coolant is), but you eliminate the possibility of a circuit separator failure (allows coolant to mix with trans fluid).. Antifreeze is lethal to a transmission, and by the time you found such a problem it would be way too late.
 

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yes, the fitting right to the radiator.

i havent bypassed my oem radiator on any of my dodges... i just plugged them inline and i have 180,000 miles on my durango with the original tranny...and i have a 2" lift with 33x12.5 tires, you wont hurt a thing running it inline with the radiator...

Taz is right about the temp though, by bypassing the rad you do run a cooler tranny temp which only helps you.
 

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Never said it would hurt anything.. that's how the auxiliary cooler is plumbed from the factory - inline with the rad cooler.. but I have personally seen OEM radiators develop leaks between the oil and water circuits on more than one occasion. IMO its a purely preventative measure.
 

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ok gotcha...good call, I haven't heard of that before, it makes sense though because as radiators age and fins rot out....they do leak, hopefully something like that is caught before it effects your tranny.....but like you said....preventative.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok thanks guy! i haven't bought anything yet, still waiting to save up some money. Can anybody show me a pic of where the line runs into the radiator? Also, anybody know of the best transmission fluid to run? Cause when i got to do this i plan on changing the trans fluid and filter.
 

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For your cooler look at the B&M plate style coolers. The tube and fin coolers are better than nothing, but plate coolers typically do a better job at cooling. They have more surface area which in turn allows for cooler fluid. A plate style is a little bit more, but once you're looking at spending $50-$75 $10 more isn't alot, and you can run a smaller plate cooler and get the same effects as a larger tube and fin.
I got either this one: http://www.summitracing.com/parts/bmm-70264/overview/
or this one: http://www.summitracing.com/parts/bmm-70255/overview/
My factory cooler is still inline(which I need to bypass), but even on hot summer days when I've been towing or kicking the shit out of my truck I can pop the hood and hold my hand against the cooler. If you just have to leave the factory one hooked up make sure the fluid comes out of the tranny, into the factory cooler then into your aux. cooler then back to the tranny.
 

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We've always plumbed our aux coolers the opposite of 91sonomast's method. To the aux cooler first, then the factory cooler, then back to lube. That way you don't overcool the transmission in the winter and it will still be a consistent temperature in the summer.
Never have had a radiator side tank cooler rupture, but have heard of a few that have. Risk is too low to not have the side tank cooler working in my book.
 
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