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I recently purchased equipment for polishing aluminum, stainless steel and other metals. I'm polishing a bunch of engine parts for some of my vehicles. To get a TRUE mirror finish on metals, it's best to buy a buffing kit. That consists of a buffing motor, buffing wheels and compounds. Through proper technique you will get desired results. There are "metal polishing" chemicals you can buy off the shelf, but all that does is just clean the surface of the metal. To really POLISH metal, you are leveling the surface to get that mirror effect. If all you're polishing is your intercooler and not much more, it might be more practical to just have it polished by someone else. Good equipment can get expensive. If you're interested, contact me and I could polish it up for you. :biggthump

Heres a link to my car and pics of my engine.
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/860717

Good Luck
 

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V8 Dragon said:
I recently purchased equipment for polishing aluminum, stainless steel and other metals. I'm polishing a bunch of engine parts for some of my vehicles. To get a TRUE mirror finish on metals, it's best to buy a buffing kit. That consists of a buffing motor, buffing wheels and compounds. Through proper technique you will get desired results. There are "metal polishing" chemicals you can buy off the shelf, but all that does is just clean the surface of the metal. To really POLISH metal, you are leveling the surface to get that mirror effect. If all you're polishing is your intercooler and not much more, it might be more practical to just have it polished by someone else. Good equipment can get expensive. If you're interested, contact me and I could polish it up for you. :biggthump

Heres a link to my car and pics of my engine.
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/860717

Good Luck
Where did you buy the polishing kit? Gotta link or something? Thanks!
 

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No matter what anyone says to use, this is the best on earth. I've used the Mothers Powerball and other polishes, but nothing compares to using this stuff by hand.




It's about $13/can, and I'm on my second one. Nothing compares to it, and they'll pay for the cost if you find something that works better.
 
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i use to use this eagle one stuff. it came in a metal can and felt like house instillation. works well and it takes rust off of exhaust tips.
 

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YellowKota2k said:
No matter what anyone says to use, this is the best on earth. I've used the Mothers Powerball and other polishes, but nothing compares to using this stuff by hand.




It's about $13/can, and I'm on my second one. Nothing compares to it, and they'll pay for the cost if you find something that works better.
Duh it's the best... it's MOTHERS!
 

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yea i think for polishing an intercooler, get one of those cans like what they said, and work at it by hand, it will take u a long ass time depending on how bad it is, but it might jus be worth it...btw why do u have an intercooler???
 

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YellowKota,do you use that on all of your aluminum or just billet?
 

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how bout zoop seal? you will need to seal up the metal after its been polished, or youll have to do it all over again pretty soon afterwards. :biggthump
 

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thanx YellowKota!!
 

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Mothers, Eagle one and all the others will work pretty well. They will not give you a mirror finish though. In order for them to work the surface must already be very nice. You will see a difference on a freshly machined part. I guarantee you that you can spend 1 week hand rubbing your intercooler and would see a noticable difference. I could then spend 1 hr. buffing it out with a wheel and you would see that much more difference again. There are 2 keys to buffing. First if you looked at the surface under a microscope it would look like a cut diamond. These facets reflect the light in all different directions. When you buff you are trying to knock the facets down so that the light is all reflected back at you. When buffing it works good if you can buff the part in opposite diagonal directions ( S.E. to N.W. and then N.E. to S.W.). This assures the facets are hit from all directions. The second key is to make sure the part is nice and warm. The heat is what helps you knock sown these facets. If you are buffing correctly the part will get so hot you will have to wear gloves to hold it. Also make sure you use the correct compounds. You will probably have to do the entire process twice. I use a brown compound first. This helps with flattening out major imperfections even if you can't really see them. I finish with a white polishing compound. I then clean all the parts with mineral spirits or acetone. I use the mothers to keep the shine going. Once polished the parts will look dirty fast. Mothers works great to keep them looking good. I know the zoops does work to seal the parts, it's just expensive. I don't mean to step on any toes, just talking from experience that's all.
 

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moore_716 said:
Mothers, Eagle one and all the others will work pretty well. They will not give you a mirror finish though. In order for them to work the surface must already be very nice. You will see a difference on a freshly machined part. I guarantee you that you can spend 1 week hand rubbing your intercooler and would see a noticable difference. I could then spend 1 hr. buffing it out with a wheel and you would see that much more difference again. There are 2 keys to buffing. First if you looked at the surface under a microscope it would look like a cut diamond. These facets reflect the light in all different directions. When you buff you are trying to knock the facets down so that the light is all reflected back at you. When buffing it works good if you can buff the part in opposite diagonal directions ( S.E. to N.W. and then N.E. to S.W.). This assures the facets are hit from all directions. The second key is to make sure the part is nice and warm. The heat is what helps you knock sown these facets. If you are buffing correctly the part will get so hot you will have to wear gloves to hold it. Also make sure you use the correct compounds. You will probably have to do the entire process twice. I use a brown compound first. This helps with flattening out major imperfections even if you can't really see them. I finish with a white polishing compound. I then clean all the parts with mineral spirits or acetone. I use the mothers to keep the shine going. Once polished the parts will look dirty fast. Mothers works great to keep them looking good. I know the zoops does work to seal the parts, it's just expensive. I don't mean to step on any toes, just talking from experience that's all.
what is the best way to get a curb mark or a dull area out on a polished style wheel?
 

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depending how bad the rash is you may have to sand it. Try and do it by hand if possible. If you use a sander or dremel be careful you don't leave a big dip. Your goal will be like painting to try and feather the work into the good edge. I have seen some paper wheels that have diamond dust impregnated into them. They cut like crazy, but also leave a good finish behind them. I have used them at work, but I can't remember who makes them. Any way you may have to sand a way onto the good part so that the area you are trying to sand doesn't show a huge dip. You have tio remove material to get the burr out. Kratex or Cratex makes the paper wheels I'm talking about. They make some other stuff that may work also. You'll have to keep stepping up the grit # sd you go. May be start with 100 then 150 and so on. When you think you are close hand buff it with some Mothers to see how it looks. This will also bring out all the minor imperfections you missed. If they aren't to bad then go ahead and start to buff them. Use a brown or cutting compound first and then finish with a white or polishing compound. Remember when yu are getting close to the finish you want get the area nice and warm. This will make it easier to smooth the area. You can buff with a dremel, an electric drill or even an angle grinder. I have used an angle grinder to buff out a transmission before. Don't ask, and I'll never do it again. That's the best I can come up with I hope it helps.
 

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i detail cars and ive found out that i hit it with neverDul first which is a cloth then i used the mothers mag and aluminum polish till it brings the shine back. try out the polishing ball or even a rag on a drill :biggthump ... be careful with that though haha but yes it does work
 

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I started to do some polishing on my convertible Mustang GT. It is alot of work, but does look good. The downside is that it takes alot of maintenance to keep up, and it never looks as good when reshining it up as it does when it comes off of the polishing wheel.

I start with rough sandpaper to smooth it down some (180), then once it is well-sanded, I go a little bit more with some 400, then 600 grit. ( probably only spend 10-20 minutes with the finer grits, just to smooth out the sanding marks made by the rougher grit.

Once it is sanded, then I take it to my buffing wheel. I start with some emery compound on my sisal wheel (compounds and polishing wheels bought from Eastwood), then usually go to some white rouge and a loose buff wheel.

Usually, after some buffing with the white rouge I see some scratches that I need to sand better by hand, then just fine tune from there.

Here are some examples. Like I said, alot of work but it does look good. In retrospect, not sure if I would do it again because now I feel like I have to do everything or it looks out of place. ;)

Vortech Power Cooler before/after:



Some valve covers I am working on, fabbing up a valve cover breather system. Before/after: (much shinier now, this was after only about three hours of work)
 

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will the valve covers and stuff stay fairly clean and shiney for awhile? i would do it if it lasts awhile
 
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