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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious as to how one changes the stock differential to a limited slip differential or posi traction differential. Since I do plan on the truck being a drift truck, it's something I need to look into. It it something you can do at the same time as changing gears in the diff or what? And I want to put a heavier duty dually axle, maybe from a Ram 3500, so I am sure that may affect it. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What is wrong with investing in one? And where can you get one from?
 

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If it's a track truck look into something like a Detroit locker or powertrax. The 9.25 is plenty strong.
 

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Home School Valedictorian
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Drifting and dually makes no sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It WILL be a track truck. Isn't just yet, but in due time. So, I'm still trying to figure out how these work. Any chance you can explain? And when changing the gears in the differential, do I need to take this into consideration? Basically does changing the gears affect it, or vice-versa?
 

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It WILL be a track truck. Isn't just yet, but in due time. So, I'm still trying to figure out how these work. Any chance you can explain? And when changing the gears in the differential, do I need to take this into consideration? Basically does changing the gears affect it, or vice-versa?
There are several types of differentials, your best bet is to Google "how a Detroit locker works" or "how a powertrax works". And if it's a track only truck a spool would work just as well. Btw the faster you get rid of the drifting dually idea the better off you'll be. And yes you want to build the entire diff at once, gears, center section, and bearings to avoid doing it twice.
 

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There are several types of differentials, your best bet is to Google "how a Detroit locker works" or "how a powertrax works". And if it's a track only truck a spool would work just as well. Btw the faster you get rid of the drifting dually idea the better off you'll be. And yes you want to build the entire diff at once, gears, center section, and bearings to avoid doing it twice.
It's not a huge job to change the differential after the gears. The hardest part of the gear setup is setting the pinion depth, and that doesn't need to be done when changing only the differential carrier.

You'll have to switch the ring gear over to the new diff, change over the carrier bearings (or, better yet, install new ones) and set the backlash to what it was before you started (You DID measure it before you took it apart, right?). If it takes you more than an afternoon, you're probably doing it wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Lol, all noted. And I'll look into all that specifically, but why is a drifting dually a "bad idea"?
 

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Home School Valedictorian
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You mean in addition to all the unnecessary fab work, extra weight, friction coefficient of 2 additional tires, and the steering dynamic change?
Adding to that, the long wheelbase of a extended cab pickup is not drifting friendly. Short wheelbase is the ticket.
 

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If you seriously considering putting a dually rear under your dakota, why not jus go the complete redneck way and just weld your stock spider gears together? lol. Thats a nice full time posi for free:jester:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You mean in addition to all the unnecessary fab work, extra weight, friction coefficient of 2 additional tires, and the steering dynamic change?
If I were concerned with what was "necessary" then I wouldn't be building a drift truck. The weight will help compensate for the weight I am adding in the front with the V-10 and help balance it some. The friction coefficient will not be changing as much as you might think. I'd be running dual narrow tires as opposed to the ones you usually see on the 2500 or 3500's.
 

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If I were concerned with what was "necessary" then I wouldn't be building a drift truck. The weight will help compensate for the weight I am adding in the front with the V-10 and help balance it some. The friction coefficient will not be changing as much as you might think. I'd be running dual narrow tires as opposed to the ones you usually see on the 2500 or 3500's.
When building a race vehicle weight is always a necessary consideration. Curious how many have you been part of? And I don't care what size tires you run you still have to overcome the friction of 4 tires instead of 2. And your doing it to counter the weight of the v10? Poor way to do it in my book. Why not add weight to the bed or bolt plates of steel to the frame? At least that way you can adjust for the track and the weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
When you plan on drifting it, you want a well-centered or at least close to centered balance of weight though. And if the surface area on the four tires is equal to the surface area of the two tires, then the coefficient of friction is the same. Granted, more weight will be added, increasing it. But with the HP being put at the rear wheels, the four sidewalls will help with support and reflex when acçelerating aggressively.And from what I understand, rigid is better (in terms of suspension) and your tires ARE a part of you suspension in a sense. I may have to add weight on top of the axle swap too though. It's already looking to be 7,000 lbs at least.
 

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Home School Valedictorian
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So you are looking at a combined contact patch equal to a pair of tires that would be used on a drift car weighing half of your expected weight. The inertia of that mass will be very difficult to control in any drifting competition.
The power to weight ratio you will need will be very difficult to achieve.
 

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And I also forgot to add the unsprung weight of the extra two wheels and the power needed to turn them. (Power you won't be able to use)


And you seem to have contradicted yourself about weight. First you talk as if it's no big deal then it's suddenly important. Did I miss something?
 

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Yeah I'm just gonna sit back and watch how this project unfolds (or more than likely doesn't ). If you want info on a pretty successful Dakota drift build check out Clints build thread, read it, take notes, etc. To me it sounds like you're building an overweight show car that won't have much success anywhere on any track, but what do I know? Hell in fact I hope you prove me wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
And I also forgot to add the unsprung weight of the extra two wheels and the power needed to turn them. (Power you won't be able to use)


And you seem to have contradicted yourself about weight. First you talk as if it's no big deal then it's suddenly important. Did I miss something?
What you probably took as a contradiction was my initial lack of desire to discuss the weight.

And I'm tired of everyone telling me to "follow what someone did". Do not mistake what I am saying, I enjoy learning from others but just copying what they do, essentially, eh... I understand that it will not be easy, or cheap, but I AM going to do it.
 
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