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I'm a little new to 4x4 vehicle recovery and I'm putting together a specific bag for when I go wheeling. For those of you that have a legit off road vehicle, what do you keep in your recovery bag and how do you organize it?

My truck has front and rear winch bumpers with a 12k lb winch in the front and another one on the way for the rear. I also keep 20L specter 20L gas cans and a High Lift with a dual hook wheel lift attachment.

So far I've got chains, hooks, a snatch block, tree saver, tow strap, tire repair kit, tire gauge, multi bit screw driver, magic siphon hose and 10mm-21mm impact socket set.


I do also have a vehicle emergency bag with standard survival gear for me to grab and go so I'm just looking to make an offroad recovery bag.
 

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Add a 8mm socket and a 1/4 socket to your tool bag. Looks like you are well informed on vehicle recovery so your set up is well prepared. What is the rating on your snatch block? Might want to consider another if you have room and plan on doing the hard core stuff. Also maybe a 3-4K come a long if you have room. They are great for securing a rolled vehicle while you set up another angle.
 

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I know this is an older post….but….I would add;

1) If you got a tire repair kit, you'll need some kind of pump. The most basic one to have would be either a simple cigarette plug type or if you want a work-out, a bicycle pump (The type that you step on to pump) Ideal would be an engine driven compressor and a tank (That way you can run air tools)

2) A block of wood. You'll need it for stuff like using as a base under your high lift to keep it from sinking, or shoving under your tires, if you need a bit more traction.

3) Spare fluids. Have an extra qt of oil and ATF just in case, and a couple of gallons of coolant. Keep a can of WD40 or similar. (WD40 can be used to dry out a wet distributor)

4) Spare parts. Every truck has a weakness. For example, older Fords have issues with starter solenoids, so carrying a spare starter solenoid would have been advisable. For a Dakota spare parts maybe extra fuses, light bulbs. Lengths of wire, etc. If you have anything in particular that tends to go bad, carry an extra.

5) Tools. Dakotas have both Metric and US standard. The most basic tools to have would be a set of wrenches from 1/2" to 3/4" and metrics from 10mm to 19mm I'd also recommend carrying a socket for the huge wheel bearing nut and a breaker bar (I forgot the size…something like 1 1/8th" -more or less) Pliers, vise grips, screw drivers and Torx drivers, hammer, gloves, jumper cables, wire cutters, and maybe a hacksaw blade

6) Might be considered more of a survival kit, but I'd include paper towels, drinking water (Lots of drinking water if you off road in arid environments) first aid kit and a .380 or equivalent (where lawful to do so)

Ed
 

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I noticed you said you had a tow strap, so I wanted to take a second and point out that tow straps and recovery straps are not the same. Tow straps have hooks on either end and are static straps, they don't stretch at all. Recovery straps have loops on either end and are dynamic, they're supposed to stretch just a little bit. Tow straps work fine for recovery, but you have to keep them taught, no yanking people out of mud holes or the strap will snap and send the metal hook on the end through a windshield. Obviously worst case scenario for demonstrative purposes.

I may have missed it as it's early here, but I didn't see a shovel in your list. A shovel is the one thing I would never go wheeling without, it'll get you out of every situation every time, it's just usually not the fastest way.
 
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