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So I drove the truck for a bit today. It's only about 10 miles total to work and back, but I didn't have any squeaking. So I guess that's a plus. I'll keep an eye out for extra brake dust.
 

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Dodge must have made the change in the spindle design to address the problem with the notched caliper slide rails on high mile Daks.
That's not why they changed. They went to a floating two piston caliper and larger rotor that provides better stopping power because the older set up was barely adequate for the weight of these trucks. Especially if used for towing. Had nothing to do with the worn slides on older models.
 

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Anything would be an upgrade. These brakes suck for my tiny regular cab!

I replaced my caliper spring retainers today, it was quick and easy. I didn't take pics but they were spaced slightly further away from the rotor, which is a plus. I bought them new on Ebay for like $11. I think the Mopar parts stores have them for like $2.35 each, but shipping will be like $10.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I have a MIG welder and I've thought of doing that myself. But since the slide rails are cast steel (I assume) wouldn't I have to preheat the area before welding so it doing create a brittle area on the slide rails.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I've got a MIG welder so come spring I'll weld up the notches on my slide rails. I wonder though, assuming the slide rails are cast mild steel, would I need to heat up the weld area with a torch to insure good weld penetration. Or, do I just turn the amperage up on the welder to insure penetration?

I just use common welding gas and welding wire I bought from Harbor Freight, so any tips are appreciated. My welding capabilities and background is limited.
 

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I had the exact same thing happen to me but I fixed it a week ago. what I did was just filled the "notches" with a Hobart 110 MIG welder and then I took an angle grinder and ground it down till it was flush and smooth and after that, I sanded it down starting with like 600 grit and ending with 2000 grit [now 2000 grit is probably overkill but it helps me sleep at night but you probably could even get away with not sanding it down at all but I just wanted to make sure the pads would be able to glide without any problems] and then that was it, put the pads caliper and wheel on and bob was your aunt. I then drove the thing and the noise was gone and over the last week, I've noticed minimal if any brake dust on my rim [i cleaned the rim after I did this fix just so I could see a difference] so id say it was a successful repair but just remember to disconnect your battery completely just to be safe. hope this helps.
 
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