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1988 Dodge Dakota LWB RC 3.9V6 3 speed auto
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I did one in my 1988; but the master cylinder in it was a new Raybestos unit.

Centric seems to get good reviews; I have a new Centric rear brake hose I plan to put on before I need to, but haven't gotten to it yet.

IIRC, the Raybestos was "Hecho en Mexico" but it's been since July 4th weekend that I put it on.

RwP
 

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1988 Dodge Dakota LWB RC 3.9V6 3 speed auto
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1,633 Posts
I abso-dam-lutely agree with not cutting corners on suspension, steering, or brakes! And electrical - well, I'm an Electronics Technician so no, I don't cut corners. At all.

If I can do it myself, I usually do. If I can't do a good enough job, I hunt for the best at it, and follow Pournelle's Law ("Open your wallet, smile, and keep smiling while they help themselves until they get tired. If that bothers you, DO IT YOURSELF." )

RwP
 

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1988 Dodge Dakota LWB RC 3.9V6 3 speed auto
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1,633 Posts
It's the "It's only me!" as the reason why I use a pneumatic bleeder.

I buy a cheap one, use it until it breaks, and buy another one.

If I were a professional mechanic, I'd have a Snap On or some other professional grade unit.

Since I'm not (I'd be a shade tree mechanic if my tree had shade!), I use this AmazonSmile: Thorstone Pneumatic Brake Fluid Bleeder Tool Kit, 1L Vacuum Brake Oil Change Set with Extractor and Refill Bottle +4 Master Cylinder Adapters + 2 Air Quick Plugs, for Car, Truck, Motorcycle 90-120PSI : Automotive .

Beats having to fight with getting them bled by myself.

Never have had good luck with self-bleeders; gravity bleeding doesn't work unless I leave it a long time, then it suddenly empties the reservoir and I'm back where I was.

RwP
 

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1988 Dodge Dakota LWB RC 3.9V6 3 speed auto
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1,633 Posts
It's amazing how fast a slow drip can empty a brake system ...

Sometimes just enough time to cook a burger and eat it.

When you've been checking it for, as you said, 7 hours or so.

Blargh.

At least it's under my control with the pneumatic bleeder.

And those don't take that much air; I have an ancient (well, 20 year old!) Craftsman oilless air compressor without a tank I use for my air needs around here (airing up tires, bleeding brakes, etc.)

RwP
 
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