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What tha duece?!
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Where is a good place/web site to get a LSD with 3.92 gears for my 2000 Durango 4.7L? Or even just a LSD?
 
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Only one comment about Randy's Ring and Pinion. If you see low prices in a magazine you WILL NOT get them ordering on line or calling unless you have the magazine, month and page to refer to. I got into a beef with them last year on the price of a gear set for my Barracuda and did not get the lower price until I had the magazine add to refer to.

Also, if your Durango is a 4x4 do not forget to order gears for the front differential too.
 

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1reddurango said:
Where is a good place/web site to get a LSD with 3.92 gears for my 2000 Durango 4.7L? Or even just a LSD?

I would call around to some junk yards. I'll bet you can get one cheap.
 

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Stock limited slip

I have a 98 5.2L Dakota, and it has a LSD stock from the factory, what i'm trying to figure out is, later in time, when i swap my diff will the stock Limited Slip work and do what it's supposed to do...Next question, i consider myself a pretty knowledgable person towars vehicles, but i've heard many different defnintions of a LSD, someone gimme the right one..

-X
 
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I am not sure if I understand your first question or not but here goes; Your axle has a differential inside it that could be either a limited slip, locker, open or the differntial could be replaced with a spool which provides no differential action. If you plan to replace your differential then you would need to replace it with a limited slip one if you still want to have the limited slip feature. Most people do not replace the differntial if it is already of the limited slip type unless they have blown it up or are getting into offroad or drag racing where the locker or spool type might be of an advantage.

As for a definition;

The differntial in your axle is there for only one reason, it allows the wheels to trun at different speeds when going around a corner. If you didn't have the differntial (as in a spool) one wheel would have to slip/scrub/chatter across the surface of the road to compensate for the miss match in speeds during a turn. This also puts tremendous amount of load on the drive train and things will break in a short period of time.

The basic open differntial allows the wheels to turn at different speeds making corners smooth and easy on the drive train action. Also, in a straight line equal amounts of torque are applied to both wheels as long as they both have equal traction. If they do not have equal traction 100% of the torque is routed to the wheel with the least amount of traction. That is why you wind up with only one wheel spinning in low traction conditions or during a burn out with the open differential.

The Limited Slip Differntial provides the same ability for the wheels to turn at different speeds when going around a corner but has the big advantage of ensuring some torque is always applied to both wheels. This is done by using clutches or other mechanical means. So what happens now going around a corner the wheels try to go at different speeds and the torque differnce between them increases to the design limit of the limited slip and they start to slip allowing the different wheel speeds. In low traction conditions both wheels will spin and during a burn out you break the wheels loose from the pavement without exceeding the required torque difference for the limited slip to slip thus both wheels spin.

Off road you you get your self into some situations where the wheels will have large differences in traction. In these situations you would wear out a typical clutch trype limtied slip quickly or may not be able to get through a tough spot. These people go for a locker, which is a differential that can be switched from open to locked via a switch in the cab. They are typical air activated.

A drag racer does not car about going around corners so they want the lightest and strongest rear end possible so a spool is used that eliminates all differntial action.

The limited slip has many designs the most common and smoothest is the clutch type which is what came from the factory in your truck. There are other designs that use a mechanical ratcheting mechanism such as the Detroit Locker or Power Trax and still others that use gears (not to be mistaken with the spider gears in the typical differential). When you hear people talk about limited slip additive it is only needed in the clutch type and allows the clutches to slide smoothly.

Hope this helps! :)
 

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are you going to attemp to install the gearing yourself?...if not you should check out your local shops. the lsd is no prblem, do it yourself.
 
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kaui56 said:
are you going to attemp to install the gearing yourself?...if not you should check out your local shops. the lsd is no prblem, do it yourself.
When i finally get around to getting one then I do plan on doing it myself. I've got my own shop so I'm setup... just broke.
 
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A pipe wrench across the flats of the yoke and a socket/breaker bar on the pinion nut (and enough leverage as in 4 or 5 ft lengths of pipe on the wrenches) is all that is needed to collapse the crush sleeve.

However, you do need an in-lb torque wrench to actually measure the bearing pre-load as you do this and of course a ft-lb torque wrench to torque the retaining caps plus set the carrier bearing pre-load. And do not forget the dial indicator to measure and set the back lash.

Also, changing gears requires that you set the pinion depth correctly. There are three ways to do this all of which will get you to the same results; (1) trial and error, (2) measure (but it requires a special tool specific to the rear end) or (3) mathematically (if the gears are provided with the offset from nominal like the factory gears).

You may luck slapping it together and have everyhthing right but much more likely you will be doing it over in a few hundred or thousand miles because the gears are burnt up or the bearings are ruined. Not a hard job, just meticulous, like engine work.

And it always helps if the rear end is out from under the vehicle and up on a bench.

Of course if you are just swapping in a LSD and staying with the same gears you only need to worry about carrier bearing preload and back lash.
 
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Don't have the dial indicators but I've got all the proper torque wrenchs and other tools. My problem is going to be patieance. That and not having another vehicle to drive while I am doing this.
 

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Along these lines...

While under my '98 D, I noticed the front diff pinion seal was leaking. I have a killer pipe wrench (like 24" or so) & a breaker bar AND a 4' pipe & that sucker will not budge! The shop manual shows using "special tools" but I have found you can usually get by w/ homemade tools that do the same thing.

Any thoughts on breaking the nut loose? The shop manual didn't say anything about reverse threads, so lefty-loosey, righty-tighty, right?
 

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N/M my last post, finally got a good angle on it after a soak w/ WD40 & broke it loose. The pinion yoke is grooved, so I'll either replace it or redi-sleeve it.

Edit
Found the yoke for $26.46 at Drivetrain Superstore, and they have the Dana Trac-Lok for the Chrysler 9.25" rear axle for $174.95. Since I have to pull my axles for the disk conversion, I'm really considering installing this unit.
 
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