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Regular core plugs are a press fit - they need to be pounded in with a hammer and a socket/pin of the correct size to fit inside the cup.

All of the core plugs were replaced on my truck, with the engine in the truck...just not all at the same time!

I did replace the ones on the back of the block - just not at the same time as the rest of them. I replaced the ones in the head, front of block, and sizes of the block at one time, then when I replaced my clutch (a few k miles later), I replaced the ones on the back of the block. Didn't see a lot of interest in pulling the transmission until I needed to, since the rear plugs were not leaking yet
right, i know i have to pound them in, so what makes that plug special compared to the regular pound in plugs? how do you get that one in? that's what i'm saying. i'm only gonna replace the ones i have to/can get to for now. from what i visible saw, the visible plugs were still in good shape. i just want to get this one replaced & my coolant system/passageways flushed of all that bad nasty coolant that was in there. it looks like my motor shit itself from the side of the block. ill check these plugs out if theyre easier to install. thank you.
 

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right, i know i have to pound them in, so what makes that plug special compared to the regular pound in plugs? how do you get that one in? that's what i'm saying. i'm only gonna replace the ones i have to/can get to for now. from what i visible saw, the visible plugs were still in good shape. i just want to get this one replaced & my coolant system/passageways flushed of all that bad nasty coolant that was in there. it looks like my motor shit itself from the side of the block. ill check these plugs out if theyre easier to install. thank you.
The Doorman expandtite copper plug that I posted above does not need to be pounded in - it is an expandable copper plug. Pop it in by hand, and crank the nut with a wrench.

These are great for places that you can't swing a hammer.
 

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awesome. im gonna grab some from advanced auto parts. so you just hole the one part with one wrench and turn the nut with another is what it looks like to me? definitely an interesting piece of hardware. than.ks.
 

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The Anti-RUB
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Those expandable plugs are for temporary fixes. They work by compressing the rubber inside to make the seal. Over time, due to engine temps, the rubber will break down and you’ll leak again. I wouldn’t use them except to get me home if a regular freeze plug blows. I’d replace the expandable plug with a proper freeze plug as soon as possible. Good luck...
 

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Those expandable plugs are for temporary fixes. They work by compressing the rubber inside to make the seal. Over time, due to engine temps, the rubber will break down and you’ll leak again. I wouldn’t use them except to get me home if a regular freeze plug blows. I’d replace the expandable plug with a proper freeze plug as soon as possible. Good luck...
You'll note that the ones I suggested have zero rubber in them.

Read the post before replying.
 

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No, it's not hard. However, it is a pain in the ass.

There are two behind the transmission (back of the block), one on the front and back of each head, and one under the starter and passenger motor mount - all of which are hard to get to.

The remainder...? Not bad at all.

If you are going to have them replaced, make sure that they are replaced with brass plugs. If you're doing it yourself - get the "deep" plugs...they are a bit more forgiving to install.

<--Replaced every single core plug on my 3.9...with the engine in the truck.
Hello how did you change the two behind the transmission did you have to pull the transmission?
 
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