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Condoms prevent minivans
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This is how to replace your front pads and rotors on a Gen I Durango 4x4. This may also be pertinent to other trucks (Dakotas, R/Ts, 2wd trucks) but you'll have to check.
As always, use your head and be safe! Proper prep and precautions means you end the day alive and in one piece.


Parts Required:
  • 1 pair rotors
  • 1 complete set of pads
  • 1 tube of high temp brake lube
  • 1 tube high temp silicone slider grease

Tools Required:
  • 1 3/4" socket (1/2" drive)
  • 1 7mm hex Allen socket (3/8" drive)
  • 1 Johnson (breaker) bar (1/2" drive)
  • 1 3/8" drive ratchet
  • 1 3/8" drive torque wrench (ft/lbs.)
  • 1 long flathead screwdriver
  • 1 large C-clamp
  • 1 can brake cleaner
  • 1 caliper painting kit (Optional - if painting calipers)


1. Clean and open master cylinder reservoir.

2. Loosen lug nuts using Johnson bar, but do not remove.

3. Raise and support truck. If not using a lift, support truck using jackstands and chock the rear wheels.


4. Remove lug nuts, remove wheel/tire.

5. If painting, now is a good time to clean the calipers using paint kit.


6. Using the 7mm hex Allen socket and 3/8" drive ratchet, remove the 2 slide pins that hold the caliper onto the knuckle. They are on the inboard side of the calipers, and are sunk into deep rubber grommets.


7. Using the screwdriver, gently pry the caliper spring off the outboard side of the calipers. WARNING - They are under tension, so they will pop and fly. Be careful!

8. Using the screwdriver again, gently (from the top) pry the caliper and pads away from the rotor. You should have the screwdriver pointed toward the rear of the truck, resting on the edge of the rotor. DO NOT LET CALIPER HANG BY THE BRAKE LINE! Either place it behind the rotor, or wire it up using wire or a coathanger.

9. Remove rotor by pulling it straight off the studs.

(Note: There may be round discs on the studs holding the rotor in place. These can be pried/cut/broken off and omitted on reassembly.)


10. Remove the pads. On the outboard, use the screwdriver to pry the spring off one side of the caliper and slide it down. The inboard pad just pulls straight out of the piston dish.


11. Using the C-clamp, press the piston back into it's bore.

(Mod Note: It is best to use a block of wood or the old brake pad between the piston and C-clamp. Phenolic pistons can get brittle and they can crack if you use the clamp directly on the piston.)


12. Install new rotor by sliding it onto the studs. Avoid touching the contact surfaces as much as possible.


13. Install inboard pad by pressing springs into the piston dish.


14. Install outboard pad by sliding spring clamp over outside of caliper and pushing up into caliper. Note - a slight film of brake lube makes this easier.

15. Lube slide pins with high temp silicone slider grease. DO NOT use regular petroleum-based grease!!


16. Lube adapter plates with high temp brake lube, then slide caliper/pad assembly onto rotor.


17. Install slide pins using 7mm hex Allen socket. Torque to 22 ft/lbs.

18. Install the caliper spring. This can be tricky - use your screwdriver and some patience, but make sure it's seated properly.




19. Give the rotor a little blast of brake cleaner and wipe it off with a clean rag.

20. Reinstall the wheel/tire, lower truck, tighten lugs. Close master cylinder reservoir.

21. Follow the manufacturer's recommended bed-in procedures.

22. Clean up!

Note - If painting (like I did) paint the caliper AFTER installation. Just be careful to not get any paint on the rotor, bleeder or pads.
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep. On the rear drums.
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I like 'em. Certainly feels like I have more grab. Only thing I don't like is they are a little noisy. I don't sound like a city bus, but there is a squeal when I first touch the pedal. I release and reapply, it goes away... Until they cool down, then it returns. It's not loud, but it's there.
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
how did you redress the contact surfaces?
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
UPDATE - 8 months later, and I regret buying EBC. Bought the Yellow Stuff Kevlar pads and the slotted and dimpled rotors... Now both rotors are warped, the pads are worn and they never did bed-in properly, even after following the manufacturer's procedure. The whole time they squealed, and got worse and worse. Brake performance was a little better than stock (it felt like it, anyway) but they simply don't hold up at all. Looking at doing this all again, only now I'm looking at SSBC rotors and Hawk pads. Anyone have their own favourite combo that works, lasts and is quiet?
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
The Latest...

After finally getting through a miserable year, I'm back to playing catch up on maintenance. And that means the El cheapo garbage discs and rotors are getting done again tomorrow morning. Now that I'm back on my feet, good brand name parts are going on again. Wasn't impressed with the EBC rotors and pads, so now I'm going with Brembo UV coated rotors and Hawk LTS pads. I'll let you all know how these work out.
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Brembos and Hawks on. Jesus... This bitch STOPS!
 
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