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Condoms prevent minivans
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This is how to replace your front pads and rotors on a Gen I Durango 4x4. This may also be pertinent to other trucks (Dakotas, R/Ts, 2wd trucks) but you'll have to check.
As always, use your head and be safe! Proper prep and precautions means you end the day alive and in one piece.


Parts Required:
  • 1 pair rotors
  • 1 complete set of pads
  • 1 tube of high temp brake lube
  • 1 tube high temp silicone slider grease

Tools Required:
  • 1 3/4" socket (1/2" drive)
  • 1 7mm hex Allen socket (3/8" drive)
  • 1 Johnson (breaker) bar (1/2" drive)
  • 1 3/8" drive ratchet
  • 1 3/8" drive torque wrench (ft/lbs.)
  • 1 long flathead screwdriver
  • 1 large C-clamp
  • 1 can brake cleaner
  • 1 caliper painting kit (Optional - if painting calipers)


1. Clean and open master cylinder reservoir.

2. Loosen lug nuts using Johnson bar, but do not remove.

3. Raise and support truck. If not using a lift, support truck using jackstands and chock the rear wheels.


4. Remove lug nuts, remove wheel/tire.

5. If painting, now is a good time to clean the calipers using paint kit.


6. Using the 7mm hex Allen socket and 3/8" drive ratchet, remove the 2 slide pins that hold the caliper onto the knuckle. They are on the inboard side of the calipers, and are sunk into deep rubber grommets.


7. Using the screwdriver, gently pry the caliper spring off the outboard side of the calipers. WARNING - They are under tension, so they will pop and fly. Be careful!

8. Using the screwdriver again, gently (from the top) pry the caliper and pads away from the rotor. You should have the screwdriver pointed toward the rear of the truck, resting on the edge of the rotor. DO NOT LET CALIPER HANG BY THE BRAKE LINE! Either place it behind the rotor, or wire it up using wire or a coathanger.

9. Remove rotor by pulling it straight off the studs.

(Note: There may be round discs on the studs holding the rotor in place. These can be pried/cut/broken off and omitted on reassembly.)


10. Remove the pads. On the outboard, use the screwdriver to pry the spring off one side of the caliper and slide it down. The inboard pad just pulls straight out of the piston dish.


11. Using the C-clamp, press the piston back into it's bore.

(Mod Note: It is best to use a block of wood or the old brake pad between the piston and C-clamp. Phenolic pistons can get brittle and they can crack if you use the clamp directly on the piston.)


12. Install new rotor by sliding it onto the studs. Avoid touching the contact surfaces as much as possible.


13. Install inboard pad by pressing springs into the piston dish.


14. Install outboard pad by sliding spring clamp over outside of caliper and pushing up into caliper. Note - a slight film of brake lube makes this easier.

15. Lube slide pins with high temp silicone slider grease. DO NOT use regular petroleum-based grease!!


16. Lube adapter plates with high temp brake lube, then slide caliper/pad assembly onto rotor.


17. Install slide pins using 7mm hex Allen socket. Torque to 22 ft/lbs.

18. Install the caliper spring. This can be tricky - use your screwdriver and some patience, but make sure it's seated properly.




19. Give the rotor a little blast of brake cleaner and wipe it off with a clean rag.

20. Reinstall the wheel/tire, lower truck, tighten lugs. Close master cylinder reservoir.

21. Follow the manufacturer's recommended bed-in procedures.

22. Clean up!

Note - If painting (like I did) paint the caliper AFTER installation. Just be careful to not get any paint on the rotor, bleeder or pads.
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep. On the rear drums.
 

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American Rebel.
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Yes^ i would also like to know.
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I like 'em. Certainly feels like I have more grab. Only thing I don't like is they are a little noisy. I don't sound like a city bus, but there is a squeal when I first touch the pedal. I release and reapply, it goes away... Until they cool down, then it returns. It's not loud, but it's there.
 

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squealing front brakes

I did the same type of replacement on my Durango, the squealing stopped after I removed the pads...redressed the contact surfaces...replaced pads...No squeals as yet.
:banana2::drive:
 

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Condoms prevent minivans
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
how did you redress the contact surfaces?
 

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The appropriate method is to use sandpaper, sanding disc, scuff disc, or steel wool to remove the glaze. Since I do my repairs on a smooth concrete surface and on my own vehicles…..yes, I just place the pads contact side down and “wax-on, wax-off”.

:banana2:

If the rotors need de-glazing, use sandpaper, sanding disc, scuff disc, or steel wool to remove the glaze. (part of the break-in by some manufactures)

Note: The above methods are for recently replaced Pads and Rotors, on old/worn units, you will most likely need to replace all or some of the components.
 

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I have photos of a rear brake job that I will post in a few days. I have to search my computers, don't remember where I saved the photos.
 

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Not to change topic but......I just replaced, basically, my entire front brake system (pads, rotors, lines, calipers, master cyl, booster). My pads are dragging and bleeding doesn't seem to solve the issue.

I didn't know about lubing the adapter plates.

How likely could lubing the plates resolve the issue?

Btw....nice write up. I opted for Wagner heavy duty pads all around, an hd drilled slotted rotors After finding the stock pads insufficient. Hd pads are noticibly an improvement, but the new master cylinder and brake booster REALLY made the difference. With 100k miles, these components seemed to make the most improvement.

rockAuto had the BEST deals on everything.
 

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I have photos of a rear brake job that I will post in a few days. I have to search my computers, don't remember where I saved the photos.

Unfortunatly I can not locate the photos and will not be doing another rear brake replacement for another few years.

:huh: :sorry:
 

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Well put together. Thank you.
Can someone do a quality how to equivalent to this for the rear drums? Including determining what size drum (in ").

Really, if you pick up a chiltons guide and do one wheel at a time, you will be fine. I hadn't done drum brakes in about 15 years. Used the Chilton guide, watched a YouTube vid and it was pretty straight forward.
 

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Really, if you pick up a chiltons guide and do one wheel at a time, you will be fine. I hadn't done drum brakes in about 15 years. Used the Chilton guide, watched a YouTube vid and it was pretty straight forward.
Same here. Not that bad of a job. I did the same thing. Chilton and YouTube. You'll learn pretty quick
 

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Stroh's Connoisseur
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Unfortunatly I can not locate the photos and will not be doing another rear brake replacement for another few years.

:huh: :sorry:
i actually need to do my front and rear brakes this spring when it gets warmer out. probably get that together and i could do a write up on that if you still can't locate the pictures you got.
 

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Removing stuck front rotors on 1999 Durango

Thanks for the informative pictorial on replacing the brakes and rotors on the Durango. My problem was that no matter what method I tried to remove the rotors (short of using blowtorch or removing the bearing nut) the rotor would not come off. The rear rotors have threaded holes into which you can insert bolts to apply preasure to break the "bond". The front rotors dont have the threaded holes.... Next best thing were the threaded holes that hold the brake calipers in place. The bolts used for holding the calipers in place were too short to apply pressure on the rotor. Getting a metric bolt M12-1.24x80, fully threaded, and inserting it into the upper brake caliper bolt hole, the bolt applied pressure on the rotor right at the lower edge of the braking surface. Applying pressure through the bolt on the rotor then lightly hammering the rotor hub started the releasing process. You will need to do this tightening and hammering several times until the rotor pops off. No need to rotate the rotor to reposition the pressure point. If the rotor is to be replace, the scarring on the braking surface does not matter... if the rotor will be resurfaces, the scarring will be removed.
 

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'00 DakotaSport QC 4X4 V8
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Really, if you pick up a chiltons guide and do one wheel at a time, you will be fine. I hadn't done drum brakes in about 15 years. Used the Chilton guide, watched a YouTube vid and it was pretty straight forward.
I got 'em done. Front and back. Those springs in the drums are damn tough. All went well. I even replaced the wheel cylinders on both rears. They were old and one looked like they packed it with grease?
Everything works grand now.

I referenced the Haynes and FSM I downloaded from one of the links on this forum.
 
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