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Discussion Starter #1
My stock fan stripped off of my water pump, so I decided to put on an electric fan and free up some HPs. I installed it perfect and everything works fine, but I'm running slightly hotter now. It's not anything to really worry about, because it's still pretty low temp, but I don't understand how I'm running warmer now. I don't know how big my stock fan was, but the electric fan is 16 inches. Any info?
 

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How many CFM does the new electric fan pull? These engines require a lot of ariflow to stay cool when using an electric. Despite its drawbacks, the clutch fan actually moves a lot of air. The preferred fan for our trucks is the Dodge Viper fan, about $150 from a dealer. Plus you will need to get all the various relays and such to get it to work properly. Moves something like 2500-3500cfm.
 

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Placement of the elec fan is crucial too. It is recommended to mount towards the top of the radiator. If it's a flexlite adjustable, you my need to tweak the adjustment to your needs.
 

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I've had a lot of experience w/ electric fans- to sum it up, if there is any way to run a clutch fan, you will move more air, and your fan shroud is designed for this fan.

I put a Chevy 383 into a 1984 RX7 and ran several variations of fans- mechanical, electric puller, electric pusher, electric puller & pusher & the clutch fan moved the most air.

When I added a Be Cool radiator and a Procharger to my Trans Am, the stock electric fans were too thick, so I made some modifications to a couple of Perma-Cool 12" fans that were rated at like 1650 CFM each and installed them in the stock shroud. They couldn't keep the car below 240 degrees, so I pulled the blower & went with the stock fans. In hindsight, I think they were too close to the core, but I also think there is no way they pull 1650 CFM.

A secondary concern in both of these vehicles was exhausting the hot air- both engine bays were packed w/ motors.

If you run an electric fan, make sure it is the proper distance from the radiator core (manufacturer specs or 1/2-1" or so) and properly shrouded so it is pulling air through the core, not from around or beside it.

These trucks have plenty of room, so cooling should not be an issue.

HTH
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's really not high enough to even worry about, but I was just curious as to why it did that. It's a 16 inch puller, and I don't remember how many cfm's it moves. Friday I'm getting a 180 stat, so it'll be all good.
 

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greygoat94 said:
It's really not high enough to even worry about, but I was just curious as to why it did that. It's a 16 inch puller, and I don't remember how many cfm's it moves. Friday I'm getting a 180 stat, so it'll be all good.
There are only a few fans that actually pull as much or more air than the clutch fan. The BM150 is one, some Spals, the Viper fan and the one from the Lincoln MarkVIII. The Taurus units also work pretty well, but are borderline for the V8s. I've been around some trucks and mustangs with the viper and Lincoln fans, and you can actually feel the air flowing underneath the truck when the fan is on high speed. BTW, the viper is a 17" fan, and the Lincoln is 18".
 

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zippycal said:
Any good recommendations for instructions on how to do a electric fan swap ?


chris
1. Engineering-
Start by measuring your radiator core and then try to find the best setup that will fit in there. This is usually two smaller fans vs. one large fan. Check for manufacturers ratings- Perma-Cool is overly optimistic IMO, but most will give you an idea of what they flow. The best setup will have a shroud that will force air through the core and yet allow air to blow through at highway speeds. Find out if anyone else has done this & what their results were. Would they have done anything differently? Also, consider where they drive. If they are in Antartica, the cooling demands are a lot less than the SoCal desert in the summer ;).

2. Wiring-
You want the fan to run only when needed. If the vehicle had electric fans(s) to start with, you can usually use the wiring already in place. If not, you should "T" into where the temp sensor is and install a fan switch that will work with your thermostat, i.e. if you have a 195 thermo, you would want the fan to come on at around 200 and off around 185 (a rough estimate, you will not have much in the way of choices here). Do not go with one of the cheapo models that locates inside a radiator hose- you are asking for a leak! You will need at least one relay (30 amp) depending on how many amps the setup will draw. Run a 10 gauge wire with a fuse near the battery + cable or power junction (smaller cable from the + side battery cable) and run this to the relay (12 volt relay wiring diagrams are usually available with the relay or online). You then run smaller gauge wiring from the sensor to the relay (trigger input) as well as grounds and a wire the same size as the fan input to the fan (you may be able to use the fan's wiring directly if long enough). You can also run an extra + wire to the dash and wire in a LED or light to show when the fan(s) is/are on.

3. Parts needed-
Fan(s) w/ shroud
Nuts/bolts/screws to mount fan
Relay(s)
.250 female terminals for relay
10 gauge wiring- red for + power supply to relay
14 gauge wiring- black for ground, red or blue for input & dash light
Inline fuse for 10 gauge wiring
Temp switch for fan
T fitting to install switch
(Optional) LED/light for dash

4. Tools needed-
Basic hand tools
Electrical crimping/stripping/cutting pliers
Soldering iron & electrical solder for wiring

I'm sure I've left a few things out, but this should get you started.
 
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