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All I can find is 2WD 2" body lift and 4WD 3" body lift. I think I want a 2" lift, not 3.

Anyone know of a place that sells its?

And I dont want to do that homemade 2" lift in fron and 1.75 in back. That looks ghey when the back sags.
 

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sorry youre not going to find a 2 inch body lift. if you only want 2 inches of lift why not just use and add a leaf or blocks in the rear and new coils or spacers up front?
 

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my mistake i didnt see that you have a 4wd the rears the same as a 2wd for the front u can just crank up the torsion bars to get another 1.5 to 2 inchs but the ride quality will suffer.
 

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Blocks will lower the rear. A lot of Durano owners do a torsion bar shackle lift. It will be about 1.75". The is not much change in ride according to them. The shackles for the rear are cheap.
 

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This is not my write up:

Shackle Lift / Torsion Bar Lift
Equipment Needed:
Shackles (Western 2001)
Washers (12 total)
Small bottle jack (hydraulic)
Jack stands
20mm wrench and socket
18mm socket with extension
15/16 socket with ratchet and breaker bar
Size 55 Torx socket
Tape measure
Loc-tite
The shackle lift / Torsion bar adjust is an easy and inexpensive way to raise the body of your Durango about 1.75”. Everyone calls this a 2” lift, but actual gain is only about 1.75”.
The first step is to order the shackle for the rear springs. I went with a Western shackle, part number 2001 from Mac’s Springs in California (www.macsspring.com). Total cost including shipping was $45. The other option is Beltech, but I believe that is closer to $70 for virtually the same part. The only other parts you will need are 12 washers (4 per shackle top and 2 per bottom) to fill in some space between the new shackle and braket. I will include pics of where the washers go later in the instructions.
You will want to jack the rear of the vehicle off the ground and put a jack stand on each side under the frame in front of the rear wheels.
I originally thought the tow hitch had to be removed but discovered on the last install I did that all you have to do is remove the bolts on the drivers side and the horizontal bolt on the passenger side. Just loosen the other 3 bolts on the passenger side and you can lower the hitch enough to get the top bolt of the shackle out on the drivers side. This is much easier than removing the whole hitch.
Go to the rear of the springs and remove the bolts holding the shackle in place. It is easiest if you remove the bottom bolt first. This takes the pressure off the top bolt and makes getting it out much easier. You may have to use a punch to drive out the bolt as it will be under some tension.
With the shackle out, you will notice that the spring actually wants to go up a little bit, when actually you need it to come down 2”. If you don’t have a small bottle jack, go down to Wal-Mart or similar store that has automotive equipment and get one for about $8. It will pay for itself with this job alone. Insert the jack between the spring and the frame so you can adjust the spring down to line up the holes with the new shackle. When you install the new shackle, insert the top bolt first and make sure the flat part of the shackle is facing the rear so that when you look at it from behind the truck you see the flat part of the shackle. This is where you will need the washers. The new shackle is slightly narrower than the stock shackle here and the washers fill that space so the shackle does not move from side to side. Some people have used garden hose washers, but I preferred something solid and went to the local hardware store and got some fairly thick washers (about equal to a garden hose washer, or a little less). I took the new shackle with me to compare hole size. I found that ½” deck washers work good and are galvanized so rust will not be a problem. I have also used 9/16” tri-metal washers, which are thicker than a standard washer and don’t have a huge outside diameter.
The bottom also uses a small 9/16” standard washer on each side of the shackle. There''s not a huge gap here so one thin washer on each side is sufficient. Torque specs call for 85 Ft.Lbs. I used a 13/16” spark plug socket on the nuts and bolts, but I think the actual size is 20 mm. I tried to put a 13/16” wrench on the nut and it was extremely tight, but the spark plug socket fit like a glove. The bottom bolt head is a size 55 torx, which can be found at Sears in the brake tool section and will fit on your socket driver. You can also use a set of vice grips on the head, but it's always better to use the proper tool and it was only about $5. One of my favorite parts about projects is the fact that it is a good excuse to get more tools, and who can’t use more tools argh argh argh.
Once the bolts are tight, you can replace the tow hitch bolts and tighten them to 80 Ft. Lbs torque. It's probably not necessary, but I think Loc-tite (blue) is always a good idea to prevent any loosening of nuts and bolts down the road. Now it's time to put the rear wheels back on the ground and move on to the Torsion bars.

Torsion Bar Adjust
The torsion bars are located on the front of the D and go from the front suspension to the crossmember right under the front doors. The bolt you need to adjust us in this cross member under the doors. My bolt was 15/16”, but looking at a 98’, it appeared smaller. You will want to jack the front of the D off the ground so the front tires are at least 2” off the ground. Again, using the frame to jack on. This way you will be “pushing” the wheels down, rather than “lifting” the truck off the wheels. The torsion bars will be tight enough, no need to make turning them any harder. You want to take some type of marking tool, (I used white out), to mark the bolt and the cross member, as well as the socket that you are going to use. This allows you to keep track of the number of revolutions you turn the bolt. I would suggest a ½” drive ratchet and a breaker bar to make turning the bolt easier. You want to turn the bolt clockwise to lift and ccw to lower if needed. If you have an impact wrench all the better, but not many of us do. For safety always wear safety goggles and hearing protection if you use an impact wrench.

In this picture you can see the white out that is still on there from when I adjusted mine. Each complete turn will raise the front of the D ¼”. Therefore, 8 turns would equal 2”. I would stop at 7 turns and see if the D is level. You can always turn it another turn if you need another ¼”. If you have to lower the front a little bit, always go past where you want to stop about 1 full turn and then adjust back up. You always want to adjust with tension, not removing tension. You will need to lower the D back onto the suspension and then either drive it around a little bit, finding some speed bumps or other “settling” devices. Come back and measure the front and rear fenders above the wheels to see if it is level.
Several people have done this and some got a front end alignment to make sure the camber was still adjusted properly. Those that have had the alignment reported that some adjustment was needed, but others that have not done the alignment have reported no abnormal tire wear as a result of the lift. Use your best judgement. I personally am trying to wear out the stock badyears so I can get a good set of tires and some chrome wheels to dress her up a little bit.
The best thing about this lift is the cost, $45 plus some change for washers, and the fact that it is not permanent, if you don’t like it, just put the stock shackles back on and adjust the torsion bars down.
 
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