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Registered
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got some feedback with the possible alternator issue....

Pulled codes 622 and 1594. Battery tested good. Charging system read High Voltage (no load 17.66v/128a loaded 17.25v/86.1a). Belts, connections, and grounds look good....

So when the test report "recommends" Regulator Service, what does that mean? doesn't the ECM control the regulator functions?

Do I need to test the Alt or just replace it?

Thanks,

Lance
2001 4.7L Dur.
 
G

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You may have a bad battery temp sensor in the bottom of the battery tray.

DESCRIPTION
The Battery Temperature Sensor (BTS) is attached
to the battery tray located under the battery.

OPERATION
The BTS is used to determine the battery temperature
and control battery charging rate. This temperature
data, along with data from monitored line
voltage, is used by the PCM to vary the battery
charging rate. System voltage will be higher at colder
temperatures and is gradually reduced at warmer
temperatures.
The PCM sends 5 volts to the sensor and is
grounded through the sensor return line. As temperature
increases, resistance in the sensor decreases
and the detection voltage at the PCM increases.
The BTS is also used for OBD II diagnostics. Certain
faults and OBD II monitors are either enabled
or disabled, depending upon BTS input (for example,
disable purge and enable Leak Detection Pump
(LDP) and O2 sensor heater tests). Most OBD II
monitors are disabled below 20 degrees F.
 

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Registered
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
BTS....never would have thought of that. All wiring for the Alt is good. I unhooked the BTS and drove up to the store....no sensors in stock, but it will be in after lunch. The charging gauge, after a couple minutes of driving, settled back to normal. Only cycled up to High Charge once, then quickly went back to normal. So maybe the BTS is the culprit....hope so.

Thanks guys....appreciate all the inputs.
 

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King Snow Dog
Joined
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9,962 Posts
Where did you find a new BTS?

Thanks
 

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Turbo Dakota Junkie
Joined
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1,912 Posts
You may have a bad battery temp sensor in the bottom of the battery tray.

DESCRIPTION
The Battery Temperature Sensor (BTS) is attached
to the battery tray located under the battery.

OPERATION
The BTS is used to determine the battery temperature
and control battery charging rate. This temperature
data, along with data from monitored line
voltage, is used by the PCM to vary the battery
charging rate. System voltage will be higher at colder
temperatures and is gradually reduced at warmer
temperatures.
The PCM sends 5 volts to the sensor and is
grounded through the sensor return line. As temperature
increases, resistance in the sensor decreases
and the detection voltage at the PCM increases.
The BTS is also used for OBD II diagnostics. Certain
faults and OBD II monitors are either enabled
or disabled, depending upon BTS input (for example,
disable purge and enable Leak Detection Pump
(LDP) and O2 sensor heater tests). Most OBD II
monitors are disabled below 20 degrees F.
Good Call!
 

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Registered
Joined
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546 Posts
wow, I didn't know those even existed eheh
 

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King Snow Dog
Joined
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9,962 Posts
Yup, allows the charging system to compensate for temperature affects on the battery. There's a lot of other crazy little things that ECM computer does if you read through the service manual, a lot more than just firing the fuel injectors (and spark plugs in case of the 4.7).
 

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Premium Member
Joined
·
994 Posts
You may have a bad battery temp sensor in the bottom of the battery tray.

DESCRIPTION
The Battery Temperature Sensor (BTS) is attached
to the battery tray located under the battery.

OPERATION
The BTS is used to determine the battery temperature
and control battery charging rate. This temperature
data, along with data from monitored line
voltage, is used by the PCM to vary the battery
charging rate. System voltage will be higher at colder
temperatures and is gradually reduced at warmer
temperatures.
The PCM sends 5 volts to the sensor and is
grounded through the sensor return line. As temperature
increases, resistance in the sensor decreases
and the detection voltage at the PCM increases.
The BTS is also used for OBD II diagnostics. Certain
faults and OBD II monitors are either enabled
or disabled, depending upon BTS input (for example,
disable purge and enable Leak Detection Pump
(LDP) and O2 sensor heater tests). Most OBD II
monitors are disabled below 20 degrees F.
Sweet. i was having an issue with my battery guage pegging all the way over to 18v...stumbled across this with a search, replaced my BTS, and no more problems...thank you bwdakrt.
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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994 Posts
The replacement sensor lasted nearly 9 years. I just ordered a new one. I have been experiencing the voltage gauge pegging at 18 volts the last couple of days.
 
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