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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 99 Dakota that I am installing my CB in. I know the fender mount for the ram will work on the Dakotas but I really don't want to mount he antenna there, what I am wanting to do is mount my antenna at the head of the bed running the wire down between the bed and cab ( keeping drilling as minimal as possible) but as we know on these trucks the head board isn't straight and we have no bed post holes ( which is really retarded in my opinion especially when the space is there for them), does anyone have any suggestions for mounting the antenna where I want or will it not work?
 

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If you want to attach it to the bedrail, best I can suggest is to get a "thru-body" antenna mount and some spherical/beveled leveling washers to offset the angle of the rail. Otherwise the next suggestion would be a ball mount through the side of the bed.
 

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With a 4ft stick I wouldn't put it right next to the cab, I'd put it to the rear of the bed. Reason being it will only be sticking up a foot or so above the cab roof, and will cause you major issues transmitting to the front. Moving it farther away from the cab will help that. I'd also put a spring at the bottom so it doesn't shatter if you hit something with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I planned on the spring either way just got to order one since 4wheel parts was out of them, so you are saying the fender mount is a bad idea then?
 

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No the fender mount in front of the cab would be okay, because the signal would propagate more toward the front. You could also counter the reflection a bit more by using the 5ft stick instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok then what if I work the cord? I removed the center seat pad and mounted the CB on the middle seat bracket, could I route the wire around to counter that?
 

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The antenna cable routing and length don't matter as long as it's not near any of the high voltage ignition parts. The position of the antenna on the vehicle, interfering metal, and the length of the antenna are what affect your radiation pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, was a idea and thought I would ask, this is my first CB so I really have no clue what I am doing. I heard that if the cord is curled up on its self that would effect its performance, is that true?
 

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Coiling up extra antenna cable in a neat coil is a bad idea when it's used for transmitting. It acts as a choke which raises your SWR (which means you transmit less efficiently, putting extra stress on the radio's finals). Antenna leads should always be cut to the proper length so there's no excess, or if that's not possible, excess cable should be bundled up in a 12-18" long "skein" (think how light rope or paracord is packaged).

Sent from a Galaxy far, far away using Tapatalk.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok then I will have to figure something out with my cord and see if I can do something to keep it neat and tidy but not choke it since I have no clue how to shorten it.
 

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Easiest way is to simply cut it. All you have to do is get a mount with "direct wire" on the bottom instead of one with the SO-239 jack. There's no secret or trick to it, you just cut the cable to length (leave about a foot of extra, in case it needs repair later), strip it like you would TV coax, and solder on the ring terminals that come with the antenna mount to the ground braid and center conductor.

 

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I don't use a CB any more, but when I did, I mounted the antenna on the left front corner of the bed. I was able to modify a bracket that I got from a home improvement store, and mount it on the lower left front bed bracket. Then I used a 3/8 (fine thread) threaded rod as an extension to the top of the bed, with a 3/8 coupler and a 36 inch top loaded antenna. That way, none of the antenna is below the top of the bed, and since it's top loaded, most of it is above the cab, but it's only slightly taller than the cab. I also used an adhesive mounted zip tie on the front of the bed to keep the antenna from banging on the back of the cab. Believe it or not, the SWR was near perfect. I don't have a photo of it on the truck, but here's one of the antenna and extension. When I quit using the CB, I was able to remove everything and put the truck back to stock.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Easiest way is to simply cut it. All you have to do is get a mount with "direct wire" on the bottom instead of one with the SO-239 jack. There's no secret or trick to it, you just cut the cable to length (leave about a foot of extra, in case it needs repair later), strip it like you would TV coax, and solder on the ring terminals that come with the antenna mount to the ground braid and center conductor.

Never messed with coax before but that does sound pretty simple, I will keep that in mind when I get my custom bed bars made.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I don't use a CB any more, but when I did, I mounted the antenna on the left front corner of the bed. I was able to modify a bracket that I got from a home improvement store, and mount it on the lower left front bed bracket. Then I used a 3/8 (fine thread) threaded rod as an extension to the top of the bed, with a 3/8 coupler and a 36 inch top loaded antenna. That way, none of the antenna is below the top of the bed, and since it's top loaded, most of it is above the cab, but it's only slightly taller than the cab. I also used an adhesive mounted zip tie on the front of the bed to keep the antenna from banging on the back of the cab. Believe it or not, the SWR was near perfect. I don't have a photo of it on the truck, but here's one of the antenna and extension. When I quit using the CB, I was able to remove everything and put the truck back to stock.
Nice, sounds like your modded antenna would sit as tall as my un-modded antenna would, unless I miss read something.
 

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I don't use a CB any more, but when I did, I mounted the antenna on the left front corner of the bed. I was able to modify a bracket that I got from a home improvement store, and mount it on the lower left front bed bracket. Then I used a 3/8 (fine thread) threaded rod as an extension to the top of the bed, with a 3/8 coupler and a 36 inch top loaded antenna. That way, none of the antenna is below the top of the bed, and since it's top loaded, most of it is above the cab, but it's only slightly taller than the cab. I also used an adhesive mounted zip tie on the front of the bed to keep the antenna from banging on the back of the cab. Believe it or not, the SWR was near perfect. I don't have a photo of it on the truck, but here's one of the antenna and extension. When I quit using the CB, I was able to remove everything and put the truck back to stock.
The only reason that worked is because the rod was the same length as the antenna itself, therefore it stayed within an acceptable wave fraction.. The threaded rod is still part of the antenna no matter how you slice it - the extra length simply allowed more of it to be above the cab. Once the coax conductor comes out of the ground plane, it - and anything connected to it - become antenna.

And as for it being "top loaded" (which it's not, fiberglass antennas are what's called "continuously loaded"), where the loading coil is located means very little in the grand scheme as long as the top of the coil is above the roofline. The loading coil itself does not radiate signal, all it does is make up the difference between the antenna's physical length and the length of a quarter-wave antenna (which for CB is 102") so it doesn't fry the finals in the radio. Your 3 foot antenna is actually twice as much loading coil than it is radiator, which means it is incredibly inefficient. Not only that, but continuous loading is actually the least efficient method. Center load is the best, which is why truckers use them pretty much exclusively.
 

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Don't worry about it.. Just don't do what he did with the threaded rod LOL. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Lol don't plan to, I will stick with my little 4ft-er till I have some good wheel time under my belt then I will just upgrade to a 102 whip, as for locations I think for now ill just mount it to the fender till the bars are made for the bed and ill find a way to mount the antenna to them so its dead center of the truck if possible.
 

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The only reason that worked is because the rod was the same length as the antenna itself, therefore it stayed within an acceptable wave fraction.. The threaded rod is still part of the antenna no matter how you slice it - the extra length simply allowed more of it to be above the cab. Once the coax conductor comes out of the ground plane, it - and anything connected to it - become antenna.

And as for it being "top loaded" (which it's not, fiberglass antennas are what's called "continuously loaded"), where the loading coil is located means very little in the grand scheme as long as the top of the coil is above the roofline. The loading coil itself does not radiate signal, all it does is make up the difference between the antenna's physical length and the length of a quarter-wave antenna (which for CB is 102") so it doesn't fry the finals in the radio. Your 3 foot antenna is actually twice as much loading coil than it is radiator, which means it is incredibly inefficient. Not only that, but continuous loading is actually the least efficient method. Center load is the best, which is why truckers use them pretty much exclusively.
I initially tried it with a 6 ft antenna and no extension, but couldn't get a good SWR. :frown:
 
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