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A lot of the codes in there (the ‘B’ codes, codes stored in the BCM, body control module) are SRS (supplemental restraint system codes) related to air bags and seat belts.

I hate to say it, but that is A LOT of codes and a most of them are related to it being in a wreck. CLASSIC indications that this rig was wrecked, repaired and promptly sold off.

Curtain squib codes indicate the side curtain airbags were deployed

seat belt pretensioners also indicate a serious accident

believe it or not, ‘squib’ refers to small explosive charge that deploys the airbags. The seatbelt pretensioners also have a small explosive charge that goes off in a wreck and locks the seatbelts momentarily.

invalid key and key comunication issues refer to what Chrysler calls “sentry key”. Its an RF chip bedded in the keys themselves that are programmed to the vehicle. Aka: “chip key”; its part of the vehicle security system. It means that veh was attempted to be started with a non-programmed key, and the computer bypassed the fuel/ignition preventing it from being started.

battery disconnected/battery sys voltage low could indicate someone tried to clear the codes by disconnecting the battery, or could indicate a bad battery or alternator, or could be from when the battery went dead.

If the unit has an unexplained electrical draw and has an aftermarket audio unit, id start there. People often incorrectly wire up the “headunit background lighting” circuit and this can cause a battery drain.

obviously, im not there to check any of these things but my advise is based on things iv seen many, many times before.
 
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👆Thats a great description of a proper draw test. Well said.

Only thing I can add is for you to make sure you dont forget about pulling fuses and relays, as described above, on the internal fuse panel as well as the one in the engine bay. Some newer vehicles even have 3, so refer to your owners manual to find them.

Also, its very unlikely that an abnormally high electrical draw that kills the battery overnight would cause any of the air bag codes. Since the trucks electrical/sensor/computer uses a Can/Bus comms system, overall system voltage being out of range CAN cause strange things under the right circumstances, usually while the truck is running, not just sitting. I have seen this often with Overcharging situations, like the known issue on Dodge Cummins diesel’s when they over change and blow up the batteries. But that doesnt mean it CANT happen with undercharging or discharging.

FYI on the ‘squib’ and pretensioner codes; thoes parts are “one and done” parts. Once they have been deployed (detonated) the whole parts need to be replaced. In this case, the side air bag units and seat belt assemblies; im some cases even the air bag control module has to be replaced or reprogrammed. It never hurts to clear the codes first and see if they come back (sometimes people do actually replace the parts after a wreck, but dont have the ability to clear the codes). Sadly, what i have seen more often is, someone buys a total loss vehicle at an auction, does a 1/2-ass job fixing it as cheaply as possible, leaves the original belts in it, cuts out or stuffs the deployed bags behind the interior trim and promptly sells it off.

I hope this is NOT what happened to you, but its a possibility.
 
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